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Lessons and Analogies from the Tokyo Skyline

Skylines just give you this sense of independence and power, especially to those with the fear of heights.

July 30, 2014 12:12 pm by: Category: Experiences, Features, Global Youth Journal, Japan, Lifestyle, Opinion, Philippines, Travel, Voice of the Youth Leave a comment

LESSONS & ANALOGIES FROM THE SKYLINE

Skylines are easily my favorite things in the world even if I’m afraid of heights. Skylines just give you this sense of independence and power, especially to those with the fear of heights. Don’t get me wrong, I still love other types of landmarks that are tall. I do love roller coasters, with all the hype and mighty drops. I love mountains too. I love the high floors in buildings. Though in truth, it’s the view I’m mostly attracted to. Every time I see a view, whether in broad daylight or in the dead of the night, the beauty seems to push the fear of falling from that high place away. Maybe that’s why I thought of these atop the Tokyo tower:

1.) Whilst admiring the view, I get this strange feeling of hope and unity. What attracted me to skylines was seeing everything once up close be a part of something more beautiful. It’s breathtaking piece-by-piece, but more beautiful as a whole. It was like the view told me that despite being miniscule on a world scale, I’m a part of something. We all are. We all are a part of something important and beautiful, but we just can’t see it. Every tiny thing I saw in Japan completed the beautiful scenery. Including those things that weren’t beautiful in that city, now, they’re a part of what makes that skyline beautiful. You matter.

Atop the Tokyo Tower

Atop the Tokyo Tower

2.) I saw the cars moving quite fast, from the top. There were boats moving at a slow pace. Imagine: in all the moving vehicles, there are people inside. In a way, skylines are quite like humans. We see good places as individuals, we see ugly places alone, and then we look at both of them as a whole and admire it. Much like how we pick up the good and the bad in people, merge them together, and judge them from that- as a whole. That’s what makes our identity; it’s what makes us unique. It’s what makes us human. Good, bad, they’re what makes us, us. Every single piece of us creates. So no matter what your good or bad qualities are, wear it proud. It’s what differentiates you from everyone else.

3.) There were people admiring the tower from below. Here I was, at the top, admiring the same monument, but from a different perspective. Both sides admiring it see the different things in our own eyes, but the same object. Seeing things differently is what makes society society. The skyline is society itself. As mentioned, we’re all a part of something- something great. However, we shouldn’t wait for something to great to come our way. Nowadays, we’re constantly waiting for things to come. Waiting for the summer break, waiting for college, waiting until we get our dream job- and then what? We shouldn’t keep waiting. We should live in the now. We must live in the present while it’s still here.

Things end but memories last forever

Things end but memories last forever

4.) Looking at the skyline and wishing I could stare at it forever, I begin to think how most good things come to an end- usually. In reality, good things end because something bad happens, so our memory of it all becomes tainted with how it ended- but just because something doesn’t last forever doesn’t mean it wasn’t good. Yes, we must live in the present, but we must also prepare ourselves for the inevitable end. Instead of remembering the bad, remember the good, and remember why you stayed and why you should not let go of that certain memory.

5.) Bidding the view goodbye, I realized how much I’ve wanted a big adventure; how much I’ve wanted to relay my own stories that sound like amazing and surreal anecdotes of some sort. Then it dawned on me, you don’t need a stereotypical big adventure (climbing volcanoes, swimming in shark-infested waters and the like) to say you actually truly had a big adventure. The real big adventure is life. You don’t need the confirmation of a life-endangering experience to say you actually lived. Sometimes, the big adventures come from everyday life, and you live it vicariously through observing. By living it by observing or actually doing, as long as you love it, who’s to say you didn’t truly live? It’s your life, live it the way you want to.

Life is an adventure

Life is an adventure

Nina Alvia is a fourth year high school student at the Immaculate Conception Academy (ICA). She is an active member of several of her school’s clubs and committees, and enjoys blogging about all her adventures.  To read more about her adventures, check out her personal blog: http://ninaalvia.blogspot.com/

Lessons and Analogies from the Tokyo Skyline Reviewed by on . LESSONS & ANALOGIES FROM THE SKYLINE Skylines are easily my favorite things in the world even if I’m afraid of heights. Skylines just give you this sense of LESSONS & ANALOGIES FROM THE SKYLINE Skylines are easily my favorite things in the world even if I’m afraid of heights. Skylines just give you this sense of Rating: 0

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