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Thinking For Seeing

Getting lost in your thoughts is easier than they say.

October 10, 2014 12:02 am by: Category: Advice, Advice, Global Youth Journal, Lifestyle, Opinion, Philippines Leave a comment

It’s easy to get lost. You’re running, you can almost live the rhythm you’ve carved out from your jogging. Being on the go, nothing can stop you, and invincibility is only a short stop away.

Then you stop, because you need to breathe, and you find that, what? Where are you? And how did you get here?

Many know the difficulty of mapping the steps, but admittedly, it’s important. After all, most don’t achieve for the laughs! Not only do you need to map your steps out, but you need to think about them. You need to strategize and analyze what’s about to happen, and why it’s going to happen. You need to introspect.

When I reached first year high school, I was flailing in a sea of people. I didn’t know what I wanted to do, or where I should go. Before I could say, “wait a minute”, a trimester had passed! Now that I’m older, it’s a lot wiser to ask yourself questions about the situation and about yourself. It can look like a lot of hassle, yet once you get used to it, you almost don’t have to try.

To achieve this state of mind, there are notes to hit. These are small baby steps. With them in mind, reflecting will be easier. Once reflection is possible, who knows what you can do? You can make better decisions, feel more self-assured, and even push yourself to do more.

First, always be unbiased. When you’re too biased towards one side, it could blind you to possibilities or faults in the decision. You can even ask others what their opinion is, just so you can have a view of the situation with a different pair of eyes.

Ask questions after this. Ask away to yourself, and write them down.  It’s saves you the trouble of having to tediously answer then ask, then repeat. Having the questions beforehand will help you see what you’re missing, or what you already have.

Last, be honest. There’s no one listening to your thoughts but yourself. Admitting the truth, even privately, lessens the danger of making mistakes. Remember, once you commit to your journey, it’s hard to turn back and correct errors. Honesty is the key to really discovering solutions.

Some people say that too much introspection leads to over-thinking. This is true. Introspection can lead to an existential crisis, tears, budding paranoia, or even too much determination to get things done. If you’re hesitating on whether to reflect or not, just remember: everything you do is a learning experience, and you need to think about your actions.

In an image, introspection is easy to visualize. Imagine yourself, submerged in water and its blue reflection. Imagine facing the light where the sun hits. This is yourself in your thoughts. Of course, swimming is vital.

When I was a child, I often sat on my heels and watched the world pass by. I don’t think my mind will be able to work at that amazing speed ever again. I’d think about people, my life, lunch time, the playground, and which stuffed toy should sleep by my side that night. It has helped me today. Reflection helps me emote and mean what I say, to deepen my papers. It has helped me become closer to my friends because I have reflected about them and their influence in my life. Along the way, plenty of stupid decisions have been stopped because I stopped and gave a second thought. Introspection is more powerful than we can ever think it to be.

Winnie the Pooh also is known for his catchphrase, think, think, think. Think! Your mind is capable of powerful things, more than scientists can even study. Using it in reflection helps. In thinking harder, we start to see clearer.

Thinking For Seeing Reviewed by on . It’s easy to get lost. You’re running, you can almost live the rhythm you’ve carved out from your jogging. Being on the go, nothing can stop you, and invincibil It’s easy to get lost. You’re running, you can almost live the rhythm you’ve carved out from your jogging. Being on the go, nothing can stop you, and invincibil Rating: 0

About Liane Reyes

Liane Reyes is a junior at the Beacon Academy. She was a former writer of Blazon, SPPC's high school publication. She also contributes to #Beacon, the school publication of Beacon Academy, and is currently writing for When In Manila, a Philippine lifestyle and entertainment blog. She takes part in different writing competitions and has been published by the Young Blood section of the Philippine Inquirer. She is always looking for opportunities to express herself and to unlock things she hasn't discovered yet.

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